Kegel Exercises Guide

All of our kegel exercises are designed to be performed with our kegel exercise balls. If you haven't already, get yours today and start your journey to stronger pelvic floor muscles.

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Online Guide

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Step by step guide from using the kegel balls to exercising for results whether a beginner, intermediate, or advanced.

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A convenient way to download our exercise guide for reference while on the go.

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What Are Kegel Exercises?

Kegel exercises, commonly known as pelvic floor exercises, are a simple and effective way to strengthen your pelvic floor muscles. The simplest way to engage the muscles that make up these exercises is to stop your urination in mid-stream. This will give you an awareness of what muscles are involved.

A common problem that can hinder the effectiveness of Kegel exercises, however, is the presence of problems with pelvic muscles other than those used for sphincter control. The muscles used for sphincter control are actually a very small volume of the total pelvic muscle picture. So while Kegel exercises help with any sphincter concerns such as incontinence when you laugh, cough, or sneeze, they may aggravate spasms or weakness in other pelvic muscles which can do more harm than good.

Pelvic floor strengthening must be balanced because of the importance of balance along the entire pelvic ring. Using a device that is concentric—such as Erotial™—allows for the best of both worlds—recapturing the proper function of all of the pelvic muscles—including sphincter control—while offering a balanced regimen that strengthens the entire pelvic musculature symmetrically

Benefits of Kegel Exercises

Kegel exercises, commonly known as pelvic floor exercises, are a simple and effective way to strengthen your pelvic floor muscles. The simplest way to engage the muscles that make up these exercises is to stop your urination in mid-stream. This will give you an awareness of what muscles are involved.

A common problem that can hinder the effectiveness of Kegel exercises, however, is the presence of problems with pelvic muscles other than those used for sphincter control. The muscles used for sphincter control are actually a very small volume of the total pelvic muscle picture. So while Kegel exercises help with any sphincter concerns such as incontinence when you laugh, cough, or sneeze, they may aggravate spasms or weakness in other pelvic muscles which can do more harm than good.

Pelvic floor strengthening must be balanced because of the importance of balance along the entire pelvic ring. Using a device that is concentric—such as Erotial™—allows for the best of both worlds—recapturing the proper function of all of the pelvic muscles—including sphincter control—while offering a balanced regimen that strengthens the entire pelvic musculature symmetrically